Health food to reduce sea lice problem

Norway — Currently and for the foreseeable future, sea lice (Lepeophteirus salmonis) is and will be the main challenge for the salmon farming industry. The sea lice live naturally in the ocean. When the number of host fish increases, the amount of lice will also increase. Because the density of salmon in farm cages is…

Vets call EU rules which demand organic fish farms treat illness using homeopathy scientifically illiterate

Veterinarians have criticised EU rules on organic farming that demands that fish are treated with homoeopathic remedies. In line with EU regulations, the first line of treatment for organic fish should be ‘substances from plants, animals or minerals in a homeopathic dilution’, before British and Norwegian vets have called the directives ‘scientifically illiterate’, saying that…

Norwegian sea lice report provide transparency

Salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infestation was first registered at the end of the 1980s in Ireland when it was found that sea trout returned to Irish rivers and fresh water to dispose of the salmon lice. One year later the same behavior was detected in sea trout in Norway. The largest salmon farming nation, Norway, has…

Is genetic advancement the answer to feeding the world?

Global agricultural food production relies on the benefits gained from many generations of selective breeding, and the vegetables, cereals and livestock we eat today are vastly more productive than the wild species our distant ancestors first domesticated. Similar benefits are beginning to become apparent in the field of aquaculture, where recent advances in production techniques,…

Funding NEMO: definite benefits for aquaculture

Preventing disease is far more efficient and cost effective than treating it; any livestock producer knows this. The question has always been, “How can we do this effectively?” Chemical and antibiotic use is no longer viewed in the same high regard as they once were due to environmental concerns. This has spurred research into new…

Breakthrough in fight against resistant sea lice

A study by the Sea Lice Research Centre (SLRC) has found new methods for detecting resistant sea lice using PCR technology. SLRC partners, the University of Bergen, the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science and PatoGen Analysis, published results regarding new methods for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with resistance towards pyrethroids and organophosphates in…