Can We Feed The World With Farmed Fish?

For years, scientists and activists have sounded the alarm that humans’ appetite for seafood is outpacing what fishermen can sustainably catch. But new research suggests there is space on the open ocean for farming essentially all the seafood humans can eat. A team of scientists led by Rebecca Gentry, of the University of California, Santa…

Record-breaking Aqua Nor!

Aqua Nor 2017 closed its doors after four fantastic days. The final count showed that no less than 27 110 visitors had found their way to the exhibition. This represents an increase of over 30% compared to Aqua Nor 2015. “A strong professional programme, excellent stands, professional stand personnel all round the exhibition and a…

Blue cod

Scientists manage to breed blue cod in captivity

For the first time, a team of scientists has succeeded in breeding blue cod in captivity, an achievement that would help to boost the aquaculture sector in New Zealand. These researchers, of the Seafood Technologies team at Plant and Food Research, have managed to farm blue cod to fingerlings, in association with Ngāi Tahu Seafood…

NOAA intends to develop commercial sablefish farming

Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) intend to find ways to make it easier and more efficient to commercially harvest sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) as part of the federal agency’s efforts for marine aquaculture to contribute to meet a growing demand worldwide for seafood. Sablefish, also known as black cod or butterfish, are…

Norwegian Stingray with optical delousing system

Stingray software system is the only of its kind and a pioneer in robotisation and automatisasion of lice removal in the aquaculture industry. By using stereo camera vision, advanced software and targeted laser, lice removal is fully automated around the clock, seven days a week throughout the year, without any handling of the fish. The…

Norway ponders producing GM salmon

The Norwegian Biotechnology Council is considering whether to approve the method of producing a genetically modified type of salmon, newspaper Aftenposten reported. The method, which was developed by researchers from the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen three years ago, implies “editing” the genes of salmon eggs so that the fish does not develop reproductive cells.…

Ocean Farm 1 – the world’s first offshore fish farm

Ocean Farming AS, a subsidiary of the SalMar Group,  is building a fish farm pilot facility, Ocean Farm 1, near the island of Froya, offshore Norway, which is fully automated to eliminate heavy manual operations, deemed to be the largest fish farm worldwide. It will be positioned in Frohavet, off the Trøndelag coast in the…

Norway turns to radical salmon farming methods

Norway’s salmon producers are turning to radical farming techniques in the face of multiple threats to their industry. From futuristic egg-shaped enclosures that bob in the water to supertanker-like structures submerged in the ocean, the Norwegian government is trying to counter increasing challenges in the form of sea lice, fish escapes and the shortage of…

Aqua Nor 2017 & Norwegian Aquaculture Tours

Novi, Michigan, USA — The Aquaculture Communications Group, LLC, (ACG) is planning a multinational group tour to see the largest cold-water aquaculture industry event in the world – Aqua Nor 2017 – in Trondheim, Norway. Then visit aquaculture industry leaders and research institutes, tour their facilities, and discuss the future of modern cold-water aquaculture, in the country where…

Salmon lice dominated 2016 fish health challenges in Norway

Updated figures indicate that more salmon die because of changing treatments against salmon lice. Increased resistance against pharmaceuticals lead more and more farmers to choose none pharmaceutical treatments. This is much harder on the fish. It is estimated that 20 percent, or one of every five salmon released into the ocean, is lost. The Norwegian…

Salmon, blue mussel, eider, and eel die from the same vitamin deficiency

Deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in wildlife is previously known as a problem among certain species within relatively limited geographical areas. Now, researchers at Stockholm University, together with several other research institutions in Europe and North America, show that the thiamine deficiency is far more widespread than previously realized. The results are published today in…

Fisheries of the US 2015 numbers released

As October, the Seafood month, comes to an end, NOAA Fisheries is released its Fisheries of the United States, 2015 report today. The report is giving a profile of the US´ fishing and seafood by the numbers.  According to this latest report, in addition to strong landings and economic values for US fishermen, the numbers reflect a jump…